fbpx

Yakuza

Yakuza, sometimes known as gokud, are members of Japanese-based global organized criminal syndicates. The Japanese police and media refer to them as bryokudan at the behest of the police, but the yakuza refer to themselves as ninky dantai. The English counterpart of yakuza is gangster, which refers to a member of a Mafia-like criminal organization. …

The Former Takatori Family Residence

Koreyoshi Takatori was regarded as one of Kyushu’s coal mining monarchs. In Saga Prefecture, he was born into a samurai family. Takatori came to Tokyo in the early Meiji Period and studied contemporary mining technologies at the Ministry of Engineering’s Mining Bureau before turning the Takashima Coal Mine in Nagasaki Prefecture into a thriving enterprise. …

Naoshima Town Hall In Japan

The town of Naoshima is a small administrative district in the Seto Inland Sea that encompasses Naoshima Island and numerous additional islands. The population of the town was just about 5,000 people in 1984, when the town hall was finished. Despite this, the town hall building drew a lot of attention. The directness with which …

Hozan-ji Temple Shishikaku In Ikoma, Japan

At the time, the advanced chief priest instructed a temple carpenter to construct a Western-style guest house. In Yokohama, where a foreign residential neighborhood had been established, the carpenter studied Western architecture for three years. He created a stunning structure by combining Japanese and Western features. It is a nationally significant cultural item that is …

Underground Platforms on the Osaka Munіcipal Subway’s Midosuji Line, Japan

The eight lines are the city’s major method of transit, as aboveground trains are significantly less popular in Osaka’s core than they are in Tokyo, which is well-served by Japan Railway trains in addition to the Metro. Foreign Japan Rail Pass holders will find that their passes are nearly useless in Osaka, where they can …

Kyoto International Conference Center

Japan left the League of Nations in 1933, and the Kyoto International Conference Center was built as a symbol of the country’s return to the international community following World War II. A government decision in 1957 expressed this desire to develop a facility comparable to the United Nations building in New York and the Palace …

Hongan-ji Dendoin In Kyoto, Japan

This edifice, which is located near Nishi Hongan-ji and was created by the renowned architect It Chta, who also designed the Tsukiji Hongan-ji temple in Tokyo, now houses a museum and an exposition hall. It was initially built for an insurance firm linked with the Hongan-ji sect 123 years ago, in the midst of the …

Lake Biwa Canal In Kyoto, Japan

The Lake Biwa Canal is a historic Japanese waterway that connects Lake Biwa with Kyoto. The canal, which was built during the Meiji Period, was originally intended to transmit lake water for drinking, irrigation, and industrial reasons, but it also served to move waterborne freight and passenger traffic. Water from the canal powered Japan’s first …

La Collina Omihachiman In Omihachiman, Japan

If plants and trees can breathe, then so can buildings made of the same soil and wood as the trees themselves. The architect appears to have attempted to replicate the concept of a living building that is in tune with its surroundings. His breathing isn’t always audible. To notice it, you must turn everything off. …

Restaurant Hasshokan In Nagoya, Japan

Hasshokan, in Nagoya, is one of the few surviving instances of modern Japanese restaurant culture, where tourists can temporarily forget about the city and relax while enjoying nature. Sonsuke Shibata, a lumber merchant, erected his villa on this site in the early Meiji period. It was renamed the Hasshokan culinary inn in 1910 and is …